One of the partners in a planned offshore Marine Energy Park in the UK South-west has backed  a new move from the Department of Energy and Climate Change to provide further financial support renewable energy.

DECC  has more than doubled the support for green energy devices by announcing that wave and tidal stream systems will in future benefit from an increase in Renewable Obligation Certificates from two to five ROCs per megawatt hour of electricity generated.

“We are very encouraged that the Government has responded to our calls and increased the support for marine renewable to 5 ROCs per Mwh,” declared Tim Stiven, managing director of Ocean Power Technologies, which is one of the companies planning to participate in the South West Marine Energy Park which is being developed off the north-west coast of the country of Cornwall, with its PowerBuoy technology.

“This is precisely the sort of action needed to accelerate the commercialisation of marine energy,” Stiven said.

Stiven says the UK enjoys considerable natural advantages, including “excellent wave and tidal conditions” as well as a dense urban population that is close to the coast. Through development of marine energy devices, he says the UK has the chance to build a world class marine energy industry “…that would create thousands of jobs, generate export earnings and provide a practical alternative to other forms of renewable energy.”

Renewable Obligation Certificates were introduced in 2005 as a green certificate to encourage electricity generators to supply more power from renewable resources and it is one of the main strategies adopted in the UK to achieve a target of 15% of electricity generation from renewable sources by 2020.

“Our PowerBuoy technology has undergone extensive in-ocean trials in Scotland and represented a multi-million pound investment by OPT in the Scottish and wider UK supply chain, supporting jobs and innovation,” Stiven pointed out.